Author Archives: ircpl-metatron

Video: “Religion and the Vote: The Role of Faith in Modern American Elections”

Religion and the Vote: The Role of Faith in Modern American Elections
Monday, October 17, 2016
More information about this event is available here.

Featuring:

Video of “The Origins of Neoliberalism” Now Available

leshem

On October 13, Dotan Leshem, a senior lecturer in the School of Political Science at the University of Haifa, spoke about his recent book, The Origins of Neoliberalism: Modeling The Economy from Jesus to Foucault (Columbia University Press).  He was joined by Daniel Colucciello Barbe, Pace University and Stathis Gourgouris, Columbia University. Gil Anidjar, Columbia University, moderator.  More information about the panel can be found here.

A video recording of the event is now available here.

 

Video: “The Origins of Neoliberalism”

The Origins of Neoliberalism – A Panel Conversation
Thursday, October 13, 2016
More information about this event is available here.

Featuring:

Dotan Leshem is a historian of systems of economic and political thought and a senior lecturer in the School of Political Science at the University of Haifa. Leshem’s book The Origins of Neoliberalism: Modeling The Economy from Jesus to Foucault was published by Columbia University Press in June 2016.

Daniel Colucciello Barber is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Pace University. He is the author of Deleuze and the Naming of God and On Diaspora, and his current research addresses the idea of conversion.

Stathis Gourgouris is Professor of Classics, English, and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is the author of Dream Nation and Does Literature Think?, and editor of Freud and Fundamentalism.

Gil Anidjar (moderator) is Professor in the Departments of Religion; the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS); and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS).  He is the author of, among other works, The Jew, the Arab: A History of the Enemy; Semites: Race, Religion, Literature; and Blood: a Critique of Christianity.

Call for Proposals: Joint Projects & Faculty Working Groups

80-claremont-3

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life is now seeking proposals from Columbia University faculty for both working groups and programs that aim to understand the role of religion in the contemporary world and its historical roots. Proposals for faculty working groups as well as seminars, conferences, events, research and other joint projects that bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars are welcome.

Typically, working groups can apply for up to $1,500 per semester and joint projects may apply for up to $25,000, with funds awarded based on activities proposed.

The deadline for working group applications for the Spring 2017 semester is Tuesday, November 8th.  Proposals will be reviewed by the Institute and results will be announced by Tuesday, November 15th.

Full details are available at ircpl.org/resources.

 

Video: “Faith, Secularism, and Humanitarian Engagement”

Faith, Secularism, and Humanitarian Engagement
Wednesday, September 21, 2016

More information on this event is available here.

Featuring:

Alastair Ager is Director of the Institute for Global Health and Development at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh and Professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health.

George Rupp is Columbia University President Emeritus and Adjunct Professor of Comparative Religion, International Affairs, and Public Health.

Introduced by Katherine Pratt Ewing, Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life; and Wayne Proudfoot, Professor of Religion at Columbia University.

Josef Sorett’s “Spirit in the Dark: A Religious History of Racial Aesthetics” Just Released

spririt in the dark

Josef Sorett, Associate Professor of Religion and African-American Studies and Director of the Center on African-American Religion, Sexual Politics and Social Justice (CARSS), has just released his first book, Spirit in the Dark: A Religious History of Racial Aesthetics through Oxford University Press.  Spirit in the Dark offers an account of the ways in which religion, especially Afro-Protestantism, remained pivotal to the ideas and aspirations of African American literature across much of the twentieth century.

Professor Sorett is currently at work on his second book, tentatively titled The Holy Holy Black: The Ironies of an African American Secular, which is also in contract with Oxford UP, and is additionally editing an anthology, The Sexual Politics of Black Churches.