Category Archives: News

Katherine Pratt Ewing Honored with Faculty Distinction

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IRCPL Director Katherine Pratt Ewing was honored recently with Faculty Distinction after having been awarded the Luce/ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism, and International Affairs Grant.  Professor Ewing, along with Alexander Stille, San Paolo Professor of International Journalism, is among the first grantees in this new program aimed at work that connects scholarship on religion to journalism training and practice.

A number of faculty from the Department of Religion were also honored, including Gil Anidjar, Clémence Boulouque, Josef Sorett, Robert Thurman, and Zhaohua Yang.  More information about the 2016 Faculty Distinction winners is available here.  The IRCPL congratulates all of the 2016 honorees.

Watch “Religion and the Vote”

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On October 17, 2016, IRCPL and the Department of Political Science convened a panel of experts to discuss the role of religion in the 2016 elections.  Participants included:

More information about the event can be found here.

A video recording of the event is now available here.

Video of “The Origins of Neoliberalism” Now Available

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On October 13, Dotan Leshem, a senior lecturer in the School of Political Science at the University of Haifa, spoke about his recent book, The Origins of Neoliberalism: Modeling The Economy from Jesus to Foucault (Columbia University Press).  He was joined by Daniel Colucciello Barbe, Pace University and Stathis Gourgouris, Columbia University. Gil Anidjar, Columbia University, moderator.  More information about the panel can be found here.

A video recording of the event is now available here.

 

Call for Proposals: Joint Projects & Faculty Working Groups

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The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life is now seeking proposals from Columbia University faculty for both working groups and programs that aim to understand the role of religion in the contemporary world and its historical roots. Proposals for faculty working groups as well as seminars, conferences, events, research and other joint projects that bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars are welcome.

Typically, working groups can apply for up to $1,500 per semester and joint projects may apply for up to $25,000, with funds awarded based on activities proposed.

The deadline for working group applications for the Spring 2017 semester is Tuesday, November 8th.  Proposals will be reviewed by the Institute and results will be announced by Tuesday, November 15th.

Full details are available at ircpl.org/resources.

 

Josef Sorett’s “Spirit in the Dark: A Religious History of Racial Aesthetics” Just Released

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Josef Sorett, Associate Professor of Religion and African-American Studies and Director of the Center on African-American Religion, Sexual Politics and Social Justice (CARSS), has just released his first book, Spirit in the Dark: A Religious History of Racial Aesthetics through Oxford University Press.  Spirit in the Dark offers an account of the ways in which religion, especially Afro-Protestantism, remained pivotal to the ideas and aspirations of African American literature across much of the twentieth century.

Professor Sorett is currently at work on his second book, tentatively titled The Holy Holy Black: The Ironies of an African American Secular, which is also in contract with Oxford UP, and is additionally editing an anthology, The Sexual Politics of Black Churches.

 

Katherine Pratt-Ewing and Alexander Stille Awarded Grant from American Council of Learned Societies

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Katherine Pratt Ewing, Director of the IRCPL, and Alexander Stille, San Paolo Professor of International Journalism, are among the first grantees in a new program from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), the Luce / ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs (RJIA), supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, aimed at pursuing programming that connects scholarship on religion to journalism training and practice.

Professors Ewing and Stille won the grant for “Sufis, Salafis, and the Public Square,” a project which brings together scholars of religious studies and experienced journalists to examine the relationships between authoritarian regimes and Salafist movements in countries where Sufism is being crowded out by heavily funded forms of Salafism and other forms of anti-Sufi Islam. Their research team will produce a database of oral histories of Sunni Muslims and government representatives as well as pieces of long-form journalism and scholarly articles that draw on the project’s ethnographic research.

RJIA grants provide support to universities with strengths in the study of religion, journalism, and media to pursue programming that connects scholarship on religion to journalism training and practice.  More information on “Sufis, Salafis, and the Public Square,” as well as the other grantees, at acls.org.