Category Archives: Media

Bampton Lecture with Daniel Boyarin 2

The 2015 Bampton Lectures in America will be given by Talmudic scholar Daniel Boyarin, speaking on: A Genealogy for Judaism.

In this series of lectures, Daniel Boyarin proposes that scholarship ought to resist using the term “Judaism” with reference to the pre-modern period. As has been argued by several scholars already, there is no “native” term with this meaning in antiquity or the Middle Ages. There is, moreover, no evidence that Jews divided off one category of their experience and practice and named it their religion. It is, therefore, a falsification of the evidence to pick out an entity and name it “Judaism.” A theoretical argument against using modern categories to analyze ancient realities will be advanced as well.  See the event page for more information.

Listen to the audio here:

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Bampton Lecture with Daniel Boyarin 1

The 2015 Bampton Lectures in America will be given by Talmudic scholar Daniel Boyarin, speaking on: A Genealogy for Judaism.

In this series of lectures, Daniel Boyarin proposes that scholarship ought to resist using the term “Judaism” with reference to the pre-modern period. As has been argued by several scholars already, there is no “native” term with this meaning in antiquity or the Middle Ages. There is, moreover, no evidence that Jews divided off one category of their experience and practice and named it their religion. It is, therefore, a falsification of the evidence to pick out an entity and name it “Judaism.” A theoretical argument against using modern categories to analyze ancient realities will be advanced as well.  See the event page for more information.

Listen to the audio here:

Bampton-Boyarin-1 Bampton-Boyarin-2

Matthew Engelke – Secular Shadows: African, Immanent, Postcolonial

Going by the lights of anthropology, political science, history, and other disciplines, it would seem that “the secular” is an irrelevant concept in, and for, sub-Saharan Africa. On Tuesday, March 10th, Matthew Engelke asks why, whether, and how that is the case. In doing so, he addresses a series of classic and contemporary discussions in the Africanist canon, and relates them to recent debates on immanence, the mundane, and critique. Eschewing ethnography proper, he moves among the texts in an effort to provoke further reflections.  For more information see here.

Listen to the audio for this event:

 

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Wael Hallaq – God’s Word: Between the Intentional and the Political

Wael Hallaq, Columbia University
“God’s Word: Between the Intentional and the Political”
Friday, February 13
4:10 – 6:00pm
80 Claremont Ave, Room 101

What does it mean for something to be ‘the word of God?’ What are the origins, forms, and functions of this concept? This seminar series will investigate what it means within the traditions of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, with a variety of scholars and thinkers.

Listen to the seminar here:

 

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Arindam Chakrabarti – Moral Epistemic Authority With or Without God

Arindam Chakrabarti, University of Hawai’i
“Moral Epistemic Authority With or Without God: The Meaning of an Imperative Sentence (Vidhi-vAkya), Nyaya versus Miimamsa”
with Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak as Chair
Friday, February 27, 10:00am – 12:00pm
Schermerhorn Extension, Room 754

What does it mean for something to be ‘the word of God?’ What are the origins, forms, and functions of this concept? This seminar series will investigate what it means within the traditions of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, with a variety of scholars and thinkers.

Listen to the lecture here:

 

Sam Haselby – The Limits of American Secularism: A Perspective from its Early History

The U.S. has made historic contributions to secularism, yet it is arguably the world’s most religious political democracy. The early history of American secularism offers some clues as to why and how these facts cohere.

More information about Sam Haselby’s talk is available here.  More on the entire Religion and Politics in American Public Life series is available at ircpl.org/americanpubliclife.

Listen to Sam Haselby’s talk in its entirety below: